Sunday, March 27, 2016

here are 2 photos of the same thing...

this first image is shot with a digital camera and a wide angle lens.
i love the clarity and sharpness.
the color and white balance are different then the film shot,
but i edited this a little differently, to look more like film, so i may have tweaked it too much?
i caught the crosses on the right, because the lens is wide angle
and i kind of like that...
i was standing in the turn lane when i shot this.





this second image was shot with a 40 year old film camera
with a longer fixed focal length lens.
i like the color in this one better, but it is a little too saturated
the whites are a little warmer, but
that's party because the sun was different when i shot this one.
the whites and color are easy enough to fix on either version...
what i don't like about this film shot is,
i had to stand pretty much across the street to get the cow head the way i wanted.
this means, i lost the crosses on the right, and i like the crosses...
i could have put a wider lens on the film camera,
but i was using a specific tilt shift lens...
i also don't like how this image is less then tack sharp, but
that could be because of the scanning...?
the full size version of this, on my computer, is pretty damn sharp
and i'm impressed with this old lens, but i'm spoiled by the clarity of digital.
i like the longer focal length, and how it changes the feel,
but i also like the wide angle.

i think i need a lens that's right in between these two...!

i also like the little bit of lint on the top right part of the sky. it's so artistic, to leave that in the final image. but...if you have lens spots, or sensor spots on your digital image, and you leave those, well...you're a lazy bastard.




i think for this test example, i like the digital better.
i'll try another one, and see what i think.

1 comment:

the walking man said...

Did you perhaps notice in the top photo you caught crosses both left and right? The cross beams of the derelict sign were the first crosses to catch my eye. Both left and right though seem to perfectly frame the bovine head.